Abstract FAQs

Version française
 

   Call for Submissions


What types of abstracts are accepted? 


Research abstracts, program description abstracts, and interactive workshops will be accepted and reviewed using separate rubrics

Research Abstract:
Research abstracts report on designing, conducting, and analyzing a research project. Research studies should be rigorous, use sound methodology, and results should follow logically from the research question.

Program Description:
Program description abstracts describe the creation and improvement of products, programs, technologies, administrative practices, or services that librarians, library technicians and information professionals conduct. A program description will go beyond simply summarizing what was done. We require that authors place their program in the context of current research and practice; provide enough information for readers to replicate or adapt the program in their own contexts; evaluate the program; and discuss lessons learned about what worked, what did not, and what might be changed.

Interactive Workshops:
Interactive Workshop abstracts describe an in-depth, engaging session on a specific topic relevant to health libraries. Included in the abstract are the session learning outcomes, target audience, description of the workshop, and description of the interactivity.

Authors will select one type of abstract for each submission during the submission process.
 

What is the required format for my abstract?


Please refer to the Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association Online Submissions page for additional guidance on writing a structured abstract. Note: Any submissions that are received without a structured abstract will be returned to authors to revise and resubmit before December 15, 2019. Late submissions will not be accepted.

Additional resources describing how to write a structured abstract:
  • Diskin, Shiri. “Ch. 6: The abstract and title.” In The 21st century guide to writing articles in the biomedical sciences. New Jersey : World Scientific, 2018.
  • Eva, K. W. (2012). Titles, Abstracts and Authors. In How to Write a Paper, G. M. Hall (Ed.). doi:10.1002/9781118488713.ch6
  • Freysteinson WM & Stankus JA. (2019). The Language of Scholarship: How to Write an Abstract That Tells a Compelling Story.  Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 50, 107-108. doi:10.3928/00220124-20190218-04, 10.3928/00220124-20190218-04 
Additional examples of structured abstracts for research projects and project descriptions can be found here.

Title: Must not exceed 120 characters

Structured Abstract: (250 words or less)  NOTE: If you are only making a submission for a Lightning Talk, you may submit your topic and a short description instead of a structured abstract.

Research Project Sections
 
Introduction:  Should clearly state the purpose of the article, summarize the rationale for the study, and review the literature relevant to the work.
Methods: Should describe the design of the study in sufficient detail to allow others to reproduce the results. Statistical methods should also be detailed sufficiently to enable a knowledgeable reader, with access to the original data, to verify the reported results. Authors should name any general-use computer programs used, provide a general description in the Methods section, and specify the statistical methods used to analyze data presented in the Results section.
Results: This section should emphasize or summarize only important observations rather than repeat all the data in the tables or illustrations.
Discussion: Should state the implications of the findings, including implications for future research, as well as limitations of the findings. The conclusions should connect with the goals of the study but avoid unqualified statements and statements not completely supported by the data.

Program Description Sections
 
Introduction: Should include the problem definition, a brief review of relevant literature to indicate how the problem or issue has been discussed or addressed by others, and the specific objective(s) of the program.
Description: This section is similar to the methods section of a research article and outlines how the program was planned, structured, and delivered. This section should describe the following: the information or service offered, the target population, the service providers, and particulars of the setting (location, period, and duration) of service delivery. This section should provide readers with the information they require to decide whether it is useful or practical to adapt this program to their own setting. While you need not include every detail of your program, major points should be highlighted. A discussion of alternative options explored and discarded as part of the program development process may be pertinent in some situations. You may wish to note that readers may contact the author(s) directly if they would like more information.
Outcomes: Demonstrate the effectiveness of a program by including an initial evaluation. Outcome measures will vary depending on the nature of the program. Examples of evaluated outcomes include user satisfaction, a change in uptake of a tool as measured by usage statistics, or before-and-after levels of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviours of the target group(s). While evaluation will likely not be done to the extent that would be the case in a research study, we do expect all program descriptions to contain some evaluative component.
Discussion: Similar to that of any scientific paper and summarizes the usefulness of the program, lessons learned, and future directions. The Discussion generally includes comparisons with related programs, implications of the new program, an outline of the program’s strengths and weaknesses, what might be done differently the next time the program is offered, or whether there is potential to expand the program to a greater number of users, or to different groups. Any other interesting or relevant issues around the program that were not addressed in other sections may be raised here. The Discussion should end with a few concluding thoughts on the program.

Interactive Workshop Sessions
Description: This section is similar to the methods section of a research article and outlines how the workshop will be planned, structured, and delivered. This section should describe the content of the session and why this would be of interest to your audience.
Level of Session: State if the workshop is at an introductory, intermediate, or advanced level.
Audience: Describe the target/ideal audience for the workshop.
Learning Outcomes: 3 to 4 statements describing in clear, measurable terms the skills and knowledge participants will gain from your session.
Method of Interactivity/Participant Engagement: Describe what active learning or interactive methods you will use to engage participants in this workshop.
Evaluation methods: Describe how you will measure the learning outcomes or ensure participants’ learning needs are met.
Author Guidelines. Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association / Journal de l'Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada, 2016. ISSN 1708-6892. Available at: https://ejournals.library.ualberta.ca/index.php/jchla/about/submissions. Date accessed: 12 Oct. 2016.

What are the evaluation criteria for research abstracts and program description abstracts?


Research abstracts, program description abstracts, or interactive workshops will be scored by two independent reviewers using the rubrics below.  Titles and abstracts will not be formatted or edited. It is your responsibility to check for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation. You will be judged in the review process on the professionalism of your submitted abstract.

Research Project

Each section will be scored on a scale between 1 to 5. Five is the highest score that may be assigned under each section. 

A - CHLA/ABSC 2019 Program Evaluation Criteria Scope (1-5)
Submissions must fit within the scope of CHLA/ABSC, and must be of interest to health sciences librarians.

B - Quality of the work (1-5) 
Proposal must be presented as a structured abstract. Are the research questions and/or topic well-defined? Is the method/approach appropriate for the research question/topic? Are the results/findings clearly reported? Do the conclusions address the research questions/topic, and are they consistent with the results/findings?

C - Innovation and perceived impact (1-5)
How significant and/or innovative is the submission? If the ideas are novel, will they also be useful or inspirational? Or, if the results are sound, are they also important? Will this work have any impact on the field?
  
D - Writing Quality (1-5)
Is the submission well-written and well-structured? Does the English/French need editing? Are the key steps of the research/program/topic clearly and easily identified? 


Program Description

Each section will be scored on a scale between 1 to 5. Five is the highest score that may be assigned under each section. 

A - CHLA/ABSC 2019 Program Evaluation Criteria Scope (1-5)
Submissions must fit within the scope of CHLA/ABSC, and must be of interest to health sciences librarians. 
  
B - Quality of the work (1-5)
Proposal must be presented as a structured abstract. Does the program go beyond simply summarizing what was done? Do the authors provide enough context to understand why the program was undertaken? Were appropriate outcomes selected and evaluated (eg. User satisfaction, usage statistics, before-and-after knowledge levels, etc.)? Does the abstract summarize lessons learned and usefulness of the program?

C - Innovation and perceived impact (1-5)
Does the abstract describe a new program or a significant change to a program? If the ideas are novel, will they also be useful or inspirational? Or, if the results are sound, are they also important? Could this program be applied in other library settings? 

D - Writing Quality (1-5)
Is the submission well-written and well-structured? Does the English/French need editing? Are the key steps of the research/program/topic clearly and easily identified? 
 

Interactive Workshops

A- CHLA/ABSC 2020 Program Evaluation Criteria Scope (1-5)
Submissions must fit within the scope of CHLA/ABSC, and must be of interest to health science librarians.

B - Target Audience & Learner Level (1-3)
Does the workshop identify the relevant target audience & learner level?

C- Innovation or perceived impact (1-5)
Does the interactive workshop abstract describe a topic or approach that is innovative and/or impactful? If the ideas are novel, will they also be useful or inspirational? Could the information from this workshop be applied in a variety of library/information settings?

D- Interactive Workshop Format (1-5)
The selected interactive workshop format is appropriate for the described content.  The interactive workshop proposal clearly states how interactivity or active learning will be incorporated. The interactive workshop as described is appropriate to present in the 60-75 minute time slot.

E- Learning Outcomes (1-3)
Are the learning outcomes and the interactive components of the workshop well- designed and clearly described?

F- Writing Quality (1-5)
Is the submission well-written and well-structured? Does the English/French require editing? Are the key components of the workshop clearly and easily identified?
 
 

How can I blind my abstract?

Abstracts must be blinded for the review process. To allow blinded review, author names, institutional affiliations, and address information must be listed ONLY in the author section of the electronic submission system, NOT in the body of the abstract. The Planning Committee reserves the right to edit abstracts containing any author, institutional, location, or company names for the purpose of eliminating this identifying information before sending the abstract to reviewers.
 

How long are the presentations?

Typically, paper presentations will be limited to twenty minutes and lightning talk presentations will be limited to five minutes. Poster authors will be asked to staff their poster during the scheduled one-hour poster reception. The interactive workshop presentation must have a hands-on component and be conducted within 60-75 minutes.
 

How do I submit an abstract?

Abstracts for papers, posters, lightning talks, and workshop sessions are to be submitted using CHLA/ABSC’s online abstract submission site. Login or create an account to submit your abstract. You may continue to make changes to your abstract until the submission deadline, December 15, 2019, 11:59 pm PST.
 

May I enter my results/outcomes and discussion when I submit my abstract?

  • Yes, you may enter your results/outcomes and discussion when you submit your abstract. All parts of the abstract (introduction, methods/description, results/outcomes, and discussion sections combined) may not exceed 250 words. 
  • Authors MAY postpone entering results and conclusions until after the peer-review process is completed. Authors selected for inclusion in the program will need to add the results and conclusions sections by March 1, 2020, if they did not already do so in the initial abstract submission. Note that the word limit for the abstract cannot exceed 250 words. Original abstract submissions may need to be modified to meet the 250-word limit.

May I include tables, figures, or citations in my abstract?

Structured abstracts should NOT contain tables, figures, or bibliographic references.
 

How will I know if my abstract is accepted?

All authors will receive an email notification regarding the outcome of their abstract submission by early February 2020. If you are an author and have not received the notification email by February 15, please contact Ashley Farrell – ashley.farrell@uhn.ca  or Stephanie Sanger - sangers@mcmaster.ca.  By early March, accepted authors will be notified of the date and time of their presentations.

At least one of the authors must attend the conference to present the paper, poster, lightning talk, or conduct the workshop.

 

How do I withdraw or cancel an abstract or presentation?

All withdrawals or cancellations must be in writing and emailed to Ashley Farrell - ashley.farrell@uhn.ca  and Stephanie Sanger - sangers@mcmaster.ca. Be sure to include the full title of your abstract and author name(s).
 

What is the difference between Interactive Workshops and Continuing Education Sessions?

Inspired by EAHIL 2019 Conference, the delegates have the option to share something that they are passionate about with fellow colleagues. Interactive Workshops are structured around active participation and active learning, while Continuing Education (CE) Sessions feature expert presenters who share their particular expertise with participants. The CE presenters are invited by the Conference Planning Committee and they are selected based on their expertise.

 

FAQs Version française


Quels types de résumé sont acceptés?

Les résumés de projet de recherche, les résumés de description de programme, et les résumés d’ateliers interactifs seront acceptés et révisés selon les critères de ces rubriques

Les résumés de projet de recherche:
Les résumés de projet de recherche présentent la conception, la conduite et l’analyse du projet de recherche. Les projets de recherche doivent être rigoureux, avoir une bonne méthodologie, et les résultats doivent être la suite logique de la question de recherche.

La description du programme:
La description du programme décrit la création et les améliorations de produits, de programmes, de technologies, de pratiques administratives ou de services qui sont réalisés par des bibliothécaires, techniciens ou techniciennes en documentation ou d'autres professionnels de l'information. Une description du programme devrait aller au-delà du simple résumé.

Nous exigeons que les auteurs situent leur programme dans le contexte de la recherche et de la pratique actuelle : qu’ils fournissent suffisamment d'informations pour que les lecteurs puissent reproduire ou adapter le programme dans leurs propres contextes, qu’ils évaluent le programme et qu’ils discutent des leçons apprises sur ce qui a fonctionné, sur ce qui n'a pas fonctionné et sur ce qui pourrait être changé.

Ateliers interactifs:
Les résumés d’ateliers interactifs décrivent des séances de discussion participative en profondeur et d’apprentissage actif portant sur des sujets traitant des bibliothèques de la santé. Le résumé structuré inclut les résultats de la séance d’apprentissage, l’auditoire visé, la description de l’atelier, ainsi qu’une description de l’interactivité.

Les auteurs sélectionneront un type de résumé pour chaque soumission au cours du processus de soumission.
 

Quel est le format requis pour mon résumé?

Veuillez vous reporter aux lignes directrices de la publication en ligne du Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada pour plus de détails sur la rédaction d’un résumé structuré. Nota : Toutes les soumissions reçues sans résumé structuré seront retournées aux auteurs aux fins de révision et de resoumission avant le 15 décembre 2019. Les soumissions reçues en retard ne seront pas acceptées.

Sources additionnelles précisant la façon de rédiger un résumé structuré :
  • Diskin, Shiri. “Ch. 6: The abstract and title.” In The 21st century guide to writing articles in the biomedical sciences. New Jersey : World Scientific, 2018. 
  • Eva, K. W. (2012). Titles, Abstracts and Authors. In How to Write a Paper, G. M. Hall (Ed.). doi:10.1002/9781118488713.ch6
  • Freysteinson WM & Stankus JA. (2019). The Language of Scholarship: How to Write an Abstract That Tells a Compelling Story. Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 50, 107-108. doi:10.3928/00220124-20190218-04, 10.3928/00220124-20190218-04
D’autres exemples de résumés structurés pour les projets de recherche et les descriptions de projets se trouvent ici


Titre: La longueur ne doit pas dépasser 120 caractères

Un résumé structuré (250 mots ou moins)  Si vous ne soumettez le formulaire que pour une présentation éclair, vous pouvez soumettre votre sujet accompagné d’une courte description plutôt que d’un résumé structuré. 

Le projet de recherche

L’Introduction: Doit stipuler clairement l’objet de l’article, résumer la justification de l’étude et réviser la documentation pertinente aux travaux.
La Méthodologie : Doit décrire le plan de l’étude suffisamment en détail pour permettre à d’autres personnes de reproduire les résultats. Les méthodes statistiques doivent être suffisamment détaillées pour permettre à un lecteur informé l’accès aux données originales afin de vérifier les résultats rapportés. Les auteurs doivent préciser tout programme informatique d’usage général utilisé, en fournir une description générale dans la section Méthodologie, et spécifier les méthodes statistiques utilisées pour l’analyse des données présentée dans la section Résultats.
Les Résultats: Cette section doit mettre l’accent ou résumer uniquement les observations plutôt que de répéter toutes les données des tableaux ou des illustrations graphiques.
L’Exposé: Doit préciser les implications des constats, y compris les implications relatives à des recherches ultérieures, de même que toutes les limites relatives des constats. La conclusion doit établir le lien avec les objectifs de l’étude, mais éviter les affirmations catégoriques et les affirmations non entièrement corroborées par les données.
 
La description du programme

L’Introduction: doit comporter la définition du problème, une brève revue de la documentation pertinente qui précise comment la préoccupation ou le problème a été abordé par d’autres, ainsi que les objectifs du programme.
La Description: est semblable à la section de la méthodologie d’un article de recherche et décrit comment le programme a été planifié, structuré et mis en œuvre. Cette section doit décrire ce qui suit : l’information ou le service offert, la population visée, les fournisseurs de service ainsi que les particularités relatives aux installations de prestation du service (lieu, périodicité et durée). Cette section doit fournir aux lecteurs l’information nécessaire qui leur permette de décider de son utilité ou de la praticabilité quant à l’adaptation dudit programme à leur propre organisme. Bien que vous n’ayez pas à inclure tous les détails de votre programme, les éléments essentiels doivent y être mis en évidence. L’inclusion du contenu des échanges portant sur des options alternatives envisagées et sur d’autres mises à l’écart lors du processus d’élaboration du programme peut être pertinente pour certaines situations. Vous pouvez indiquer aux lecteurs qu’ils peuvent communiquer directement avec l’auteur ou les auteurs pour obtenir plus d’information.
Les Résultats: démontrent l’efficacité d’un programme par l’inclusion d’une première évaluation. Les mesures des résultats varieront selon la nature du programme. Parmi les résultats évalués, on retrouve la satisfaction des utilisateurs, un changement du niveau d’utilisation d’un outil, tel que mesuré par les statistiques d’utilisation, ou l’évaluation des connaissances avant et après, des compétences, des attitudes et des comportements du ou des groupes visés. Bien que l’évaluation ne soit vraisemblablement pas effectuée avec la même rigueur que pour une étude de recherche, nous nous attendons à ce que toutes les descriptions de programme comportent certains éléments d’évaluation.
L’Exposé: est semblable à celui de tout article scientifique et résume l’utilité du programme, les leçons qui en sont tirées ainsi que les orientations futures. L’Exposé comporte généralement des comparaisons aux programmes connexes, les implications du nouveau programme, un descriptif des forces et des faiblesses du programme, ce qui peut être accompli différemment la prochaine fois où le programme sera offert ou s’il comporte un potentiel d’expansion pour application à un nombre accru d’utilisateurs ou à des groupes différents. C’est ici que peuvent être abordés d’autres aspects du programme qui n’auront pas été traités dans les autres sections. L’exposé doit se terminer par quelques réflexions de conclusion sur le programme.
 
Séances d’atelier interactif

Description : La présente section est semblable à celle des méthodes relatives à un article de recherche et décrit la façon dont l’atelier sera planifié, structuré et mené. Cette section doit décrire le contenu de la séance ainsi que la raison qui suscite l’intérêt de votre auditoire.
Niveau de la séance : Précisez si l’atelier en est un de niveau d’introduction, intermédiaire ou avancé.
Auditoire : Décrivez l’auditoire cible ou idéal pour l’atelier.
Résultats d’apprentissage : Trois ou quatre énoncés décrivant clairement, en termes mesurables, les compétences et les connaissances qu’acquerront les participants à votre séance d’atelier.
Méthode d’interactivité / de participation active des participants : Décrivez quelles méthodes d’apprentissage ou d’interactivité vous utiliserez pour assurer la participation active des participants à cet atelier.
Méthodes d’évaluation : Décrivez la façon dont vous mesurerez les résultats d’apprentissage ou à quel point les besoins d’apprentissage des participants auront été comblés.

Author Guidelines. Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association / Journal de l'Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada, 2016. ISSN 1708-6892. Available at: https://ejournals.library.ualberta.ca/index.php/jchla/about/submissions. Date accessed: 12 Oct. 2016.

Quels sont les critères d'évaluation pour les résumés de projets de recherche et les résumés de descriptions de programme?

Les résumés de recherche et les résumés de la description du programme seront marqués par deux examinateurs en utilisant les rubriques suivantes. 

Les titres et les résumés ne seront pas reformatés ni modifiés. Il est de votre responsabilité de vérifier l'orthographe, la grammaire et la ponctuation des textes soumis. Vous serez jugé dans le processus de révision sur le professionnalisme du résumé soumis.

Chaque section sera notée sur une échelle de 1 à 5. Cinq est l'évaluation la plus élevée qui peut être attribuée dans chaque section.

Le projet de recherche

A - Portée des critères d'évaluation du Programme ABSC/CHLA 2020 (1-5)
Les soumissions doivent entrer dans le champ de l'ABSC/CHLA et doivent être d'intérêt pour les bibliothécaires des sciences de la santé.

B - La qualité du projet (1-5)
La proposition doit être présentée comme un résumé structuré. Assurez-vous que les questions de recherche et les thèmes soient bien définis, que les résultats sont clairement transmis, que les conclusions respectent le thème et que le tout soit cohérent.

C - L'innovation et l'impact perçu (1-5)
L'impact de votre projet est évalué sur son caractère innovateur et sur sa portée, la nouveauté des idées véhiculées, son utilité ou sa capacité à inspirer. Les résultats doivent être cohérents et avoir un impact dans le domaine.

D – La qualité d'écriture (1-5)
Est-ce que la présentation est bien écrite et bien structurée? Est-ce que la langue a besoin de révision? Est-ce que les principales étapes de la  de la recherche, du programme ou du sujet sont clairement et facilement identifiées?

La description du programme

A – Portée des critères d'évaluation du Programme ABSC/CHLA 2020 (1-5)
Les soumissions doivent entrer dans le champ de l'ABSC/CHLA et doivent être d'intérêt pour les bibliothécaires en sciences de la santé.

B - La qualité du projet (1-5)
La proposition doit être présentée comme un résumé structuré. Est-ce que la description du programme va au-delà du simple résumé? Est-ce que les auteurs fournissent un contexte suffisant pour comprendre pourquoi le programme a été entrepris? Est-ce que les résultats appropriés sont sélectionnés et évalués (par exemple, la satisfaction des utilisateurs, des statistiques d'utilisation, les niveaux de connaissance avant et après une activité, etc.)? Est-ce que le résumé présente les leçons apprises et l'utilité du programme?

C - L'innovation et l'impact perçu (1-5)
Est-ce que le résumé décrit un nouveau programme ou un changement significatif à un programme? Si les résultats sont pertinents, sont-ils aussi importants? Ce programme pourrait-il être appliqué dans d'autres environnements de la bibliothèque?

D – La qualité d'écriture (1-5)
Est-ce que la présentation est bien écrite et bien structurée? Est-ce que la langue a besoin de révision? Est-il facile de répérer les principales étapes de la recherche, du programme ou du sujet traité?

Ateliers interactifs

A – Portée des critères d'évaluation d’atelier interactif de l’ABSC / CHLA 2020 (15)
Les soumissions doivent correspondre au champ d’application propre à l’ABSC / CHLA être d’intérêt pour les bibliothécaires des sciences de la santé.

B – Auditoire cible et niveau d’apprentissage (1-3)
L’atelier s’adresse-t-il à l’auditoire approprié et correspond-il au niveau d’apprentissage adéquat?

C- Innovation ou effets perçus (1-5)
Le résumé structuré de l’atelier interactif traite-t-il d’un sujet ou d’une approche novatrice ou susceptible de répercussions importantes ? Si les idées sont originales, seront-elles aussi utiles ou inspirantes? L’information présentée dans le cadre de cet atelier peutelle s’appliquer dans une variété de bibliothèques ou de centres d’information?

D- Format d’atelier interactif (1-5)
Le format choisi d’atelier interactif est approprié pour le contenu décrit. La proposition d’atelier interactif énonce clairement la façon dont l’interactivité ou l’apprentissage actif y seront incorporés. La présentation de l’atelier interactif telle que décrite est appropriée pour la période allouée de 60-75 minutes.

E- Résultats d’apprentissage (1-3)
Les résultats et les éléments interactifs de l’atelier sont-ils clairement décrits?

F- Qualité d’écriture (1-5)
La soumission est-elle rédigée et structurée correctement? Est-ce que la langue nécessite de la révision? Les éléments de l’atelier sont-ils clairement et simplement précisés?
 

Comment puis-je anonymiser mon résumé?

Les résumés doivent être anonymes pour le processus de révision  à l’aveugle . Pour permettre la révision à l’aveugle, les noms des auteurs, leurs affiliations institutionnelles et leurs adresses  doivent figurer SEULEMENT dans la section «auteur » du système de soumission électronique, PAS dans le corps du résumé.

Le Comité de planification se réserve le droit de modifier les résumés contenant tout nom d’auteur, d’institution, d’emplacement ou noms de société dans le but d'éliminer toute information d'identification avant d'envoyer le résumé aux examinateurs.
 

Quelle est la durée des présentations?

Généralement, une durée limite de vingt minutes est prévue pour les présentations d’article alors que cinq minutes est la limite prévue pour les discussions éclair. Les auteurs d’affiches doivent être présents pour discuter de leurs affiches lors de la réception d’une heure qui leur est réservée. La présentation d’atelier interactif doit comporter une activité pratique et durer de 60 à 75 minutes.
 

Comment puis-je soumettre un résumé?

Les résumés d’article, d’affiche, de discussion éclair et de séance d’atelier doivent être soumis par le biais du site de soumission de résumé en ligne de l’ABSC / CHLA. Ouvrez une session ou créez un compte pour soumettre votre résumé. Vous pouvez continuer à effectuer des modifications à votre résumé jusqu’à la date limite de soumission qui est le 15 décembre 2019, 23h59 heure normale du Pacifique.
 

Puis-je inclure mes résultats et conclusions quand je soumets mon résumé?

  • Oui, vous pouvez inclure vos résultats et vos conclusions quand vous soumettez votre résumé. Notez que toutes les parties du résumé (objectifs, méthodes, résultats et conclusions) ne peuvent pas, en tout, dépasser 250 mots.
  • Les auteurs PEUVENT attendre la fin du processus de révision pour soumettre leurs résultats et leurs conclusions. Les auteurs sélectionnés pour participer au programme de la conférence devront ajouter les résultats et les conclusions d'ici le 1er mars 2020, si ceux-ci n’ont pas déjà été inclus lors de la soumission du résumé. Notez que la limite de contenu pour le résumé ne peut pas dépasser 250 mots - les résumés originaux peuvent devoir être modifiés pour respecter cette limite de 250 mots.  

Puis-je inclure des tableaux, des figures ou des citations dans mon résumé?

Les résumés structurés ne doivent pas contenir de tableaux, de figures ni de références bibliographiques.
 

Comment pourrai-je savoir si mon résumé est accepté?

Tous les auteurs recevront une notification par courriel concernant les résultats de leur soumission de résumé au début du mois de février 2020. Si vous êtes un auteur et si vous n'avez pas reçu de courriel de notification le 15 février 2020, veuillez communiquer par courriel avec Ashley Farrell - Ashley.Farrell@uhn.ca ou Stephanie Sanger - sangers@mcmaster.ca. Au début de mars, la date et l'heure de leur présentation seront précisées aux auteurs.

Au moins un des auteurs doit assister à la conférence pour donner la présentation, l’exposé éclair, présenter l’affiche ou diriger l’atelier.
 

Comment puis-je retirer ou annuler un résumé ou une présentation?

Toutes les annulations et tous les retraits doivent être faits par écrit et acheminés par courriel à Ashley Farrell - Ashley.Farrell@uhn.ca ou à Stephanie Sanger - sangers@mcmaster.ca. Assurez-vous d'inclure le titre complet de votre résumé et le(s) nom(s) d’auteur(s).
 

Quelle est la différence entre « Ateliers interactifs » et « Séances de formation continue » ?

Inspirés de la conférence EAHIL 2019 (European Association for Health Information and Libraries), lors des ateliers interactifs, les délégués ont la possibilité de partager avec leurs collègues ce qui suscite leur passion. Les ateliers interactifs sont structurés à partir d’une participation et d’un apprentissage actifs, alors que les séances de formation continue font appel à des présentateurs qui partagent leur expertise avec les participants. Les présentateurs de formation continue sont invités par le comité de planification de la conférence et sont sélectionnés selon leur expertise.